Announcements


This page contains all the announcements from the whole semester.

Project Summary 2009

by samooresamoore (24 Dec 2009 16:10; last edited on 29 Dec 2009 15:03)

I will be posting your course grades sometime late Thursday. I have finished recording your assignment grades on the Web site.

How I arrived at your project grades

Discussion

  1. I have a grading rubric (basics, sources, resource evaluation, appropriate background content, appropriate current events content, information specialist tutorial, general organization, extras) that I used to guide my grading. I have a separate page (with comments) for each of you that I filled out. I will make copies of these pages and leave them with my secretary in room R5492; you can pick them up (to take and keep for yourself) any time in January; after the end of January she will throw them out.
  2. The actual number grade that shows on your grade sheet will be different than the grade you have recorded. I gave everyone 30 out of 30 for the first parts of the project. The grade you have on your grade sheet is the percent of the remaining 70 points that you received. For example, suppose your grade sheet shows that you received an 80. Then your recorded grade on the project would be 30 + 80% * 70 = 86.
  3. Before you ask me specific questions about your grade, be sure to read all of the information below; concentrate especially on the great projects just below and the “Fantastic examples” farther down; these provide very clear examples of just what I was looking for, and of what your classmates were able to produce.
  4. My general reaction to these sites is that some of you did a lot of work and apparently enjoyed working on your sites. It showed. I learned a lot from many of your sites.

Grade distribution

Here's information about the distribution of grades on the final project, including a stem-and-leaf table and summary statistics.

10|00000
 9|0000222244678
 8|055788
 7|2368
 6|229
 5|7
  • Average: 86.5
  • Median: 90
  • StDev: 12.2

Points of mis-understanding

  1. Vital information missing from reports
    • Common effective searches on Web search engines related to the topic
    • Real time search
    • Video search
    • "Info for professor" should be one sub-item in a menu; no need to otherwise feature it on the home page
    • If you list your current events in some table, be sure to have a link nearby that link to all the current events, not just a subset of them
  2. Resource evaluation
    • Many people simply did not include many of the resource types that we learned about this semester. The project was your opportunity to show me that you mastered these tools.
  3. Background information
    • Don't use only company-sourced information. First, anyone can find it. Second, it's not exactly an unbiased source of information.
  4. Custom search engine
    • One of the most important parts of anyone trusting your CSE is knowing from what sites and pages it is pulling information. You needed to document this within your site.
  5. Interface decisions
    • Almost without fail, you all created attractive, easy-to-read sites.
    • I would encourage more of you to learn to scale down your graphics, justify them to one side or the other, and wrap the text around the graphic. This makes it easier to read your text.
  6. Current events
    • It was good to set up a page of your "shared" RSS feed items. But this wasn't enough.
    • It was better to have news items that you provided short (1 or 2 sentences) commentary on.
    • It was best to have either news items throughout the semester that you provided insightful analysis of or had analysis of multiple news items per week.
  7. Information specialist tutorial
    • A minimal tutorial is one in which you simply explained the menu choices on your site with a little commentary.
    • A FAQ-style tutorial was a bit better.
    • The best is when you provide commentary on what needs to be done in order to master the topic at hand.

Fantastic examples

In the following I list example pages within project wikis that really stood out as great examples of what I was hoping to see.

  1. The whole site
  2. Home page
  3. Resource evaluation
  4. Background information
  5. Tutorial
  6. Blogroll and RSS Feed reviews
  7. Current Events

Course Grade 2009

by samooresamoore (24 Dec 2009 16:53; last edited on 24 Dec 2009 17:18)

Here are some instructions if you have questions about any grades from this semester.

  • FYI, the "Total Points" field on the Grade page doesn't mean anything. It's been acting up and isn't calculating correctly.
  • If you have questions about your project grade:
    • Be sure to read the post about project grades
    • Be sure to pick up your project grade sheet from my secretary
    • Be sure to look at the examples of good projects
  • If you have questions about any part of your term project, send me an email explaining your question and I'll look into it. Be sure to have "BIT330" in the subject of your email. I will get back to you within 2 school days of receiving your question (but not before January 12).
  • If you have questions about anything related to this course or your grade, send me an email. (Same requirements as the previous point.)

Participation Grades 2009

by samooresamoore (24 Dec 2009 16:08; last edited on 24 Dec 2009 16:08)

Much of what we did in this course revolved around work that we did during class time. This is where we generated new information so that we could learn about these evolving Internet tools. These three grades had three components:

  • Twitter participation — I looked at each of your twitter accounts going all the way back to the beginning of the semester. Much of our in-class activities required you to send tweets; these tweets were how we gathered feedback and learned about the quality of many of the tools we looked at.
  • Experiment participation — I looked at the different times that you were asked to fill out a table on the site with experimental results.
  • Miscellaneous — Were you engaged during class? Were you working on the in-class exercises or were you working on homework from other classes? Did you post information to the class wiki?

Statistics

  • Minimum: 50
  • Median: 100
  • Average: 95.3
  • Maximum: 100

Search Engine Analysis Assignment Information

by samooresamoore (30 Nov 2009 14:54; last edited on 07 Dec 2009 15:40)

In this post I provide some feedback based on my grading of this assignment.

Rubric

These are the points that I looked for in your assignment. Some people focused on one part more than another because of the nature of the particular search engine that they looked at — I understand that.

  1. Demonstration
    1. how to use the tool
    2. cover the highlights of the tool
  2. Analysis
    1. discuss the points highlighted by one of the frameworks
  3. Comparison
    1. demonstrate how this tool differs from competitors
    2. use 2-3 competitors
    3. analysis of specific query results
  4. Overview/Executive summary
    1. effective overview of the analysis
    2. include recommendation

General comments

  1. Word choice difficulties
    • "it's" means "it is"; "it's" is not a gender neutral possessive
    • You say or do something "too much" or "too many", not "to much"
    • "most unique" is not correct usage — "unique" means "one of a kind". It's like saying someone is a little pregnant; she either is or isn't.
    • "choose" rhymes with "lose", and it's a present tense verb
  2. Formatting difficulties
    • Pluses, not asterisks (bold), are used for headlines
    • Asterisks (with space) are used for unnumbered lists
    • Don't use a theme in which your links are basically invisible; I need to know what I can click on (in order to see what work you've done); I shouldn't have to hunt.
    • Graphics that you include in a page must be named with a single word (with no spaces).
  3. Graphical annotations (such as a red circle) help a lot any time you're using a screen capture graphic.
  4. Some of these search sites have lots of other functionality. Be sure to focus your write-up on the search part of the site.

Information for next year

Now that I have graded a set of assignments, I understand better what is easier to read and what makes a better analysis. Thus, for next year, I'm going to include the following information in the assignment description.

  1. Be sure to compare to Google if at all possible. However, compare your search engine on its own terms. For example, if your search engine is for movies, then compare your site to others based on their ability to find movie-related information.
  2. Your writing should be easily scannable. You should not compose long paragraphs that fill a screen.
  3. Suggested structure:
    • Create a separate wiki containing just the search engine analysis.
    • Provide link to one page; this page should contain the executive summary of the report (which you will write last).
    • A menu on the site (on the top, not side, of the page) should point to all the pages in this report (in order).
    • Should have one page for each of the following:
      1. executive summary — This should be a true summary, briefly summarizing what you wrote in the rest of the report. The bottom of this page should have a recommendation as to 1) whether someone should use this tool, and 2) if so, how should they integrate this tool into their search behavior.
      2. the demonstration — screen captures accompanied by text or video demonstration (either is capable of giving you full credit; neither is seen as superior to the other)
      3. the analysis — You should explicitly use the framework in "Deconstructing the search experience" to analyze your search engine.
      4. all of the comparisons that you do — You should compare your search engine to Google (if at all appropriate) and to 2 other specialized search engines.
        • In the comparison, you should run three queries and show/describe how the results differ for the different search tools. You can do this in the most informative way possible (whatever is most appropriate for your purposes).

Test Results

by samooresamoore (07 Dec 2009 15:31; last edited on 07 Dec 2009 15:31)

Here's information about the test results.

Most missed

Q Missed Skipped Total
21 26 1 27
27 19 4 23
20 20 2 22
32 20 2 22
25 19 2 21

Least missed

Q Missed Skipped Total
2 0 0 0
5 0 0 0
23 0 0 0
1 1 0 1
4 0 1 1
6 1 0 1
16 0 1 1

Multiple Choice Statistics

This is for just the multiple choice questions. The total possible is 84 points.

  • Average = 66.3
  • Median = 68.0
  • Min/Max = 52/78

Total Points Statistics

These are for the whole test of 150 points.

  • Average = 121.9 (81.3%)
  • Median = 123.0 (82.0%)
  • Min/Max = 90.0/141.0 (60.0%/94.0%)

Points (out of 150) Stem-and-Leaf

This shows the distribution of actual points earned (out of 150). It shows that the lowest grade was 90 and the highest grade (earned by 3 people) was 141.

9 0
10 445568
11 34679
12 11337788
13 11112236
14 111

Percent (out of 100%) Stem-and-Leaf

This is the above information converted to percentage scores.

6 099
7 001256789
8 112255557777889
9 1444

Analysis For Search Engine Assignment

by samooresamoore (02 Nov 2009 17:21; last edited on 02 Nov 2009 17:21)

When you are doing the analysis for the search engine assignment, I pointed you to the slides from class 2 which I have loaded at slideshare. I told you to look at slides 12, 13, and 17. But slideshare numbers by build, and that means you should actually look at slides 18, 26, and 44.

I bet you'll find those slides a lot more helpful as you write the assignment.

If you're looking at the PDF of the slides, you can disregard this (and still look at 12, 13, 17).


Search Engine Demonstration

by samooresamoore (27 Oct 2009 21:58; last edited on 27 Oct 2009 22:02)

I've gotta tell you that I'm somewhat disappointed with the level of communication and/or planning ahead that's going on in our class. I'm getting all sorts of questions about the assignment that's due tomorrow. What's worrisome is that you had all sorts of opportunities to ask me questions about this. If there are a number of you with these questions then

  • Why did I only talk to two students at office hours today and yesterday?
  • Why didn't I get questions on this Monday during class?

Am I scary? Am I too scary to ask questions of in class? Do I not seem like I'm trying to help? I really am. I'm trying to make myself available to you but I do ask that I get some level of commitment from you, some amount of planning ahead, some amount of thoughtfulness so that I don't feel like my availability is being taken advantage of.

I know these are ambiguous assignments. I said so in the assignment itself. That's why I gave you so much lead time on the assignment. I don't give you lead time so that you simply do it all the night before. If that's what you're going to do then I would have made this a one-week assignment from beginning to end. And that doesn't make sense.

So, what are you supposed to do for this assignment? You are supposed to demonstrate how to use the Web site. Point out the major features of the site. Point out the advanced search features. Demonstrate what type of searches it appears to be designed for. That type of thing. I figured that was clear from the word "demonstration". But I also knew this would be somewhat ambiguous. I am okay with this. I know that some of you are going to do different things than others. That's okay! This isn't Calculus. This isn't Physics. This isn't the 500th time that this class has been taught or that this assignment has been given. It's the first time for this assignment, so I'm expecting some variability in what you do. That's okay with me. You should learn to deal with this ambiguity. Life works that way sometimes (actually, almost all of the time).

How long should it be? Long enough. For some of you with really simple search engines, the demonstration probably will take 1-2 pages if it includes lots of screenshots. For others of you with really complicated search engines, the demonstration probably will take many more pages. This is why I didn't tell you how long it should be — because it depends on the search engine you have chosen. Your demonstration should be long enough to show someone who hasn't gone to the site how to use the search engine. You don't need to point out every single little feature — for some search engines that would be nearly endless (and pointless). And it shouldn't be longer than it needs to be. I'm not going to reward length just for the purpose of length.

I hope this helps. And I hope many of you learn to plan ahead a bit more than I'm currently seeing.

(I'm sorry for the attitude of this blog entry. I'm going to talk about this in class on Wednesday. I would give you this answer in class so that it wouldn't sound so snippy, but it won't do you any good if I tell you this information at that time — you need it now. So this announcement is a preview of what we are going to talk about.)


Following BIT330 Tweets

by samooresamoore (24 Sep 2009 14:56; last edited on 07 Oct 2009 13:54)

I have used Tinker (a tool recently put into beta) to create a widget that I have embedded in the announcements page. This widget will show all tweets that include the #bit330 hashtag. It should update in real time. Now you can, simultaneously, check for any recent announcements and any recent tweets about the class. Let me know if you find it useful (or not).


Creating The Blog Template File

by samooresamoore (18 Sep 2009 21:44; last edited on 18 Sep 2009 21:44)

The blog template file is, in one way, just like any other file. So you create it like any other file (e.g., type the name in the address bar or in the "New page" box to the left).

But it's a special page for two reasons. First, it's named in a special way (i.e., a colon followed by "_template"). This name automatically links this template to all future files named with "blog:" followed by some string of words. Second, since it's a template page it can contain special characters and terms (all of those percent sign things).

In my course wiki, I have a template "annc:_template" for all pages (such as this one) that are named "annc:" followed by a string of words.


Links To All Student Projects

by samooresamoore (30 Aug 2009 15:07; last edited on 30 Aug 2009 15:07)

Here are the links to all of the final projects.

  1. Investment Banking Industry by bryblumbryblum
  2. Alternative Energy in the US by Eric BrackmannEric Brackmann
  3. Start Up Process by dylanbdylanb
  4. HIV/AIDS Non Profit Initiatives by CaitdCaitd
  5. Automobile Industry by HcflowHcflow
  6. SEMCOG Transit Panel by thauckthauck
  7. Software-as-a-Service by BrianHeM10BrianHeM10
  8. Mortgage Industry by hermatz does not match any existing user name
  9. Walt Disney Pictures by Susan KennedySusan Kennedy
  10. U.S. Travel Services: Airlines by laytosplaytosp
  11. Internet Infrastructure by tmuirtmuir
  12. Apple the Company by dpnickdpnick
  13. OIL: U.S. and the World by roopakroopak
  14. Defense & Aerospace Industry by mlrossitmlrossit
  15. Music Recording Industry by schmidkeschmidke
  16. Social Networking by jenstanjenstan

General Feedback About The Term Projects

by samooresamoore (30 Aug 2009 15:07; last edited on 30 Aug 2009 15:07)

I will be posting your course grades sometime late Thursday. I have finished recording your assignment grades on the Web site.

How I arrived at your project grades

Discussion

  1. I have a grading rubric (basics, sources, resource evaluation, appropriate background content, appropriate current events content, information specialist tutorial, general organization, extras) that I used to guide my grading. I have a separate page for each of you that I filled out. I will make copies of these pages and leave them with my secretary in room R5492; you can pick them up any time in January; after the end of January she will throw them out.
  2. Before you ask me specific questions about your grade, be sure to read all of the information below, and concentrate especially on the “Fantastic examples” section; these provide very clear examples of just what I was looking for, and of what your classmates were able to produce.
  3. My general reaction to these sites is that some of you did a lot of work and apparently enjoyed working on your sites. It showed. I learned a lot from many of your sites. That being said, the following were the few that really stood out for me:

Grade distribution

Here's information about the distribution of grades on the final project, including a stem-and-leaf table and summary statistics.

10|00
 9|367
 8|02568
 7|577
 6|8
 5|8
 4|6
  • Average: 81.8
  • Median: 83.5
  • StDev: 15.1

Points of mis-understanding

  1. Resource evaluation
    • You don't evaluate “Web resources” (as one group), you evaluate specific Web sites separately.
      • Suppose you were doing a report on a specific company. One way to evaluate resources would be to list and describe Web sites that have business related news. Better evaluations would have links to coverage of that specific industry and company, maybe via a search of that Web site, maybe via a specific column or writer at that Web site. Yes, this is more work; yes, this would mean that you would link to fewer Web sites; however, it would also mean that the links that you provide would be more useful to the reader. Simply providing a long list of business Web sites isn't that difficult or useful — do something more for me that I couldn't do simply with a quick Google search.
    • Don't forget to tell me about those Web search engine queries and blog search engine queries that were most useful for you and that would be most useful for the analyst in the future for finding certain types of information. This is quite important.
    • When telling me about Web directories, you should point to the categories within the directories (if any) that you found that are related to your project. Even if you don't find the information in the category useful because you already know of the sites, you should still link to it because the reader would know what you considered and where to look in the future for updates.
    • You don't evaluate “Tag-based sites”, you evaluate digg or furl or delicious or whatever. You might group the evaluations of these three sites together because they are all tag-based sites, but you don't evaluate them as one entity.
    • When telling me about an RSS/blog search tool, you should provide examples of the queries that you used (and links to their results if possible) when telling me whether or not the tool is useful.
  2. Background information
    • There are two main points to the background information section. First, to provide useful background information. (Shocking!) Second, to provide a series of places to go in order to read more information; an annotated list of such readings would be quite useful and appropriate.
  3. Custom search engine
    • You should list the sites included in your custom search engine in order to give the user some idea of what he/she is getting. On the Google Custom Search home page for your CSE it will list a few of the sites but it will not list all of them if you have more than five or six.
  4. Interface decisions
    • I'm not a big fan of using images in an index of other pages; they simply take up too much room and require too much scrolling (1, 2).
    • If you have a long page that requires a lot of scrolling, think about how you might break this up into smaller chunks. One way to know if it's too long: think about how you might tag the page. If you want to apply tags to specific parts of the page that don't apply to other parts of the page, then it's too long.
  5. Current events
    • Don't just describe what happened — link to articles that provide more details than the simple summary that you provide. You should provide a short summary — show me that you thought about the event you're linking to.
  6. Information specialist tutorial: There is a lot of confusion over this section. It should be a fairly major section of the report. Think of how you would teach another BBA who (horror of horrors) didn't take this class and who isn't familiar with your topic but who is Web-savvy:
    • What Web sites should they start with?
    • What search tools should they use to find more sites in the future? What hints can you provide about useful queries? Could you put together a custom search engine to make it easier to search these sites?
    • How useful are social sites? Are any specific tags more or less useful? Which specific sites did you find most useful?
    • For Web directories, did you find them useful? What categories did you find related to your topic?
    • For news sites and blog search engines, did you find any categories that were useful? What searches do you suggest they use? Could you put together a Yahoo Pipe to help combine these queries to make them easier to find?
    • Did you find useful images at any of the image search engines? What queries were most useful?
    • For podcasts and videos, were there any channels that had useful content on a related industry or on your company?
    • Did any alternative search engines provide information specifically tailored to your topic? What were they, and how were they helpful?
    • And so on, and so on.

Fantastic examples

In the following I list example pages within project wikis that really stood out as great examples of what I was hoping to see.

  1. Home page
    1. Software as a Service: good menus (top and side), good intro text, other useful information readily available
    2. SEMCOG Transit Panel: easily scannable, much information available in the top half of the page, good intro text.
    3. Alternative energy: easily scannable information on page, usefully organized side menus (top menus could have been better).
  2. Resource evaluation
    1. Software as a Service
    2. Apple Inc.
  3. Background information
    1. Alternative energy: notice the introductory text, the links to further readings and resources (of all types), and a pertinent video to kick things off.
    2. Start-ups: some introductory text, and links with descriptions to further readings and resources (of all types).
  4. Tutorial
    1. Software as a Service
    2. Social Networking: an absolutely fantastic way to structure this information (for this particular project).
  5. Blogroll
    1. Software as a Service
  6. Integration of Yahoo Pipe output into wiki
    1. Start-ups: this is a great example of using the Feed module to integrate an RSS feed — in this case, from a Yahoo pipe — directly into a wiki page.
  7. News
    1. Software as a Service: for this type of project, with lots of sub-topics, this is a useful formatting strategy
    2. Apple Inc.: useful summaries and organizational strategy for this project
    3. Investment banking: I like this style of writing a summary and providing links to a couple of related stories below it. (I'm indifferent to the pics, especially as used in the index because it makes it too long.)
  8. Site design tips and tricks
    1. Disney: this wasn't part of the project, but it (apparently!) is something that interests Susan, so she wrote up a bunch of tips on using wikidot.
  9. Custom Search Engine
    1. Mortgage Industry: included all the information that I need to understand the CSE.
    2. Alternative energy: interesting way of integrating the CSE into the site
    3. Start-ups: puts CSE high on home page and provides a useful link to an explanation of what it's actually searching.
  10. Providing information about a resource type that ends up not being useful:
    1. Alternative energy

Spelling

  • "aesthetic" (superficial attractiveness), not "ascetic"
  • "straight" (not curved), not "strait"
  • "separate", not "seperate"
  • "utilize", not "utalize"

Summary

Don't worry, I'm going to include all of this information in next year's project description. This is too useful not to include. This is part of the reason (actually, most of the reason) that I want you to keep your sites public for at least the next 18 months.


RSS Feeds And Your Term Project

by samooresamoore (30 Aug 2009 15:07; last edited on 30 Aug 2009 15:07)

I noticed several things about RSS feeds and the difference for those who handle this part better than others:

  • There are a selection of RSS feeds from specific Web sites that are specific to your topic.
  • There are RSS feeds from a variety of social and news sites that might be filtered using Yahoo Pipes into one tightly focused feed. This feed is then documented clearly so that the reader knows what he/she is getting.

Further, (and this is not at all required) there is a Feed module defined by Wikidot that allows you to put the RSS feed contents themselves right within Wikidot pages (if, and only if, you are interested in doing such a thing). I'm only putting this here for those of you who are interested because I just found this module.


Hint About CSEs And Your Term Project

by samooresamoore (30 Aug 2009 15:07; last edited on 30 Aug 2009 15:07)

I have read a bunch of blogs about your custom search engines, and have had the opportunity to look at your CSEs fairly in-depth. Some observations:

  • You generally get the idea behind CSEs. This is very good.
  • You could provide a very useful tool to the incoming analyst by incorporating multiple Web sites related to your topic. This is the real value that you are providing — knowledge of what Web sites among the millions on the Web provide useful, relevant, and trustworthy information about your topic. Given all that you know about your topic, it would be surprising to me if you had only 2 or 3 sites included in your CSE.
  • The other way to make this tool useful is to add the terms that would be used to search the Web for your topic. This is a bit trickier to use, but if it is appropriate for your topic, it can also be useful.

Grades For Project Status Report 3

by samooresamoore (30 Aug 2009 15:07; last edited on 30 Aug 2009 15:07)

Here's information about the grades for this status report.

  • Range: 50 — 100
  • Median: 77.5
  • Average: 76.9

I will be posting your grades to the Web site (to your sitemaker record) soon.

If you want to get a better grade at the end of the semester on this project, then you should carefully read this announcement about the term project.


Term Project Status Reports

by samooresamoore (30 Aug 2009 15:07; last edited on 30 Aug 2009 15:07)

I don't expect you to have completed everything on this list, but this is what I was looking for at this time. The ideal project will end up having all of this (as appropriate for the particular project); each of you will be evaluated against the ideal for your topic. What I do expect to find today is that you'll have made progress on each of these by this time. You have a little over two weeks until the final version is due.

It's Sunday and I'm looking through all of your projects. I hope to send each of you an email describing what I saw (and didn't see) by the end of today. I'm not going to comment on everything at this point — I'm just going to give a couple of comments about how I see your project progressing.

  1. Home page: Organized, scannable, introduces visitor to site
  2. Most of you will have the following types of information (which should all be easily findable):
    • Background information
    • Recent current events
    • Instructions (for the new analyst) on how to keep up with ongoing current events
    • Descriptions (of background information for the professor)
  3. Appropriate use of wiki software
    • Menu system should be helpful (top and/or side menus)
    • Pages should be usefully tagged throughout the site
  4. Sources
    • RSS feeds you found useful; what information they contain; evaluation of each source's validity
    • Web sites that you frequently refer to (you don't have to evaluate every Web site that you refer to, just those that are more important to your project); evaluation of each of these source's validity.
    • A page that contains your blogroll
  5. Search tools
    • Information about how you used the search tools we learned about in this class. I'm not interested in getting a full tutorial on these tools — I want you to tell me how you used them for this project.
    • How did you use email alerts (if at all — or why not) on this project
    • How did you use page monitors (if at all — or why not) on this project
    • Deep Web search sites that you found useful for this project
    • Web directory entries that you found useful
    • Tag-based sites that led you to useful information for this project. You should describe those tags that helped you find this information.
    • Podcast and video search tools that led you to useful information for this project. You should describe those searches that helped you find this information.
    • Image search tools that led you to useful information for this project. You should describe those searches that helped you find this information.
    • Deployment of a custom search engine that would help the visitor find useful information as easily as possible. Be sure to explain the ways in which you customized this search tool.

People Search Tools Results

by samooresamoore (30 Aug 2009 15:07; last edited on 30 Aug 2009 15:07)

These are the results of our people search exercise.

The results are shown as "A/B" where "A" is the number of times the result was found; "B" is the number of times the result was not found. The "Traffic" column is scaled to zabasearch.com (as 1.0). Some are not listed because they are simply too large; I was more interested in seeing just how used some of these smaller sites are.

The sites that I listed as "Better sites" are those that performed above average on both the people search test and reverse phone lookup test.

People search Reverse phone lookup Traffic
Search engine Results Results (ratio)
Better sites
Google 14/1 11/1
Yahoo 12/3 11/1
WhitePages 10/4 11/1 5.8
ZabaSearch 11/3 9/1 1.0
SuperPages 10/6 11/2 0.05
Switchboard 13/3 11/2
WhoWhere 12/2 11/1 0
iSearch 13/3 7/2 0.0
Worse sites
Ask 12/3 8/4
Cluuz 11/3 1/9
Live 10/2
411 Locate 7/8 10/2 0
ZoomInfo 5/10 0.05
AnyWho 9/8 12/2 5.3
Yahoo People Search 8/6 9/1
Pipl 13/2 0.05
Spock 8/6 0.1
Yasni 6/8 0.0
Wink 10/5 0.05
123People 10/5 0.0

Do Yourself A Favor

by samooresamoore (30 Aug 2009 15:07; last edited on 30 Aug 2009 15:07)

…and watch this video. It's only 5 minutes long but it has a great message.


Test Information

by samooresamoore (30 Aug 2009 15:07; last edited on 30 Aug 2009 15:07)

(I sent this as an email, except for the one bold sentence below. This is just for record keeping.)

Just a clarification: I'm getting test questions from

  • your questions
  • your notes
  • my slides
  • my daily notes
  • daily exercises

And that's in no particular order. (I'm not anywhere near done putting it together.) I'm looking for a couple of things in putting together the questions:

  • Would you know the answer just by completing the exercises (and meaningfully reflecting on those exercises)?
  • Would you know the answer if you knew the main points from each day's lecture? (Which, in theory, relates to pertinent knowledge in the world of search.)

Better questions would be about information that will be useful for the next 3-5 years. Acceptable questions would be questions that would show that 1) you understand and are familiar with today's search technologies, 2) you are a skilled user of today's search technologies, 3) you will be an informed consumer of soon-to-appear search technologies. I'm looking to test you on useful information.

Worse questions would be about 1) insignificant details related to specific technologies that we are currently using, 2) generalizations about technology that don't help you evaluate new technologies or understand existing technologies.


Helpful Pages For Studying

by samooresamoore (30 Aug 2009 15:07; last edited on 30 Aug 2009 15:07)

When gathering information to put together your test, I created the following pages:

  1. All student notes
  2. Daily schedule pages
  3. All questions
  4. All exercises
  5. Search syntax

Election News

by samooresamoore (30 Aug 2009 15:07; last edited on 30 Aug 2009 15:07)

To make it easier to look around the Web and see what's going on with this election (and all the post-election coverage), I created this election page with a variety of news and opinion sites.

Enjoy!

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